–SOLD OUT–

Improving Recovery In Diverse Populations

Cultural Competency Skills Workshop

A community-wide event for all mental health practitioners
Space is limited. Register today!

Discover new approaches to diagnose and treat clients and patients of a different
cultural, ethnic, religious and sexual orientation than your own.

Conference Location
Promega BioPharmaceutical Technology Center
5445 East Cheryl Parkway
Fitchburg, Wisconsin 53711

photo2

This daylong educational program, set for September 28, is designed to assist mental health professionals improve their ability to assess, diagnose and treat individuals from diverse cultural, ethnic, spiritual and religious backgrounds.

In an ever-increasing multi-cultural and ethnically diverse society, mental health professionals must be sensitive to differences stemming from cultures beyond personal experience.

This daylong educational program is designed to assist mental health professionals improve their ability to assess, diagnose and treat individuals from diverse cultural, ethnic, spiritual and religious backgrounds.

Psychiatrists, psychotherapists, nurse practitioners, psychiatric nurses, social workers and law enforcement officials are encouraged to attend.

For information, please contact Ron Luskin at 262.490.2898 or ronluskin@tds.net

photo1

Learning Objectives for the Conference

• Create awareness related to privilege and implicit and explicit bias, and barriers of misunderstanding affecting positive interactions.

• Examine cultural stereotypes and barriers of misunderstanding that compromise diagnosis and treatment.

• Discuss various models of culturally competent mental healthcare.

• Recognize when care coordination needs to be modified to accommodate cultural differences and/or limited English language skills.

• Identify opportunities for improved care coordination to accommodate cultural differences.

• Learn about latest scholarly research related to cultural competency skills.

Sponsors

photo3

GOLD

National Guardian Life Insurance Co. “It’s about people”

WPS Charitable Foundation “Fostering healthy communities”

Anonymous donor

SILVER

Madison Gas & Electric “Your community energy company”

SSM Health St. Mary’s Hospital “Through our exceptional health care services, we reveal the healing presence of God.”

BRONZE

Ho-Chunk Nation “People of the big voice”

Johnson Bank “Your solutions partner”

UnityPoint Health–Meriter “The point of everything we do is you”

United Way of Dane County “We’re doing what works”

UW Health and Unity Insurance “Physicians, researchers and other healthcare professionals. Remarkable.”

RECOGNITION

JP Cullen “Building smart, building strong”

Madison Metropolitan School District “We stand by all of our students, staff and families”

NAMI Dane County “Education, advocacy, support and awareness”

IN KIND

Promega Corporation  “Stay curious”

Thysse Printing “Where you go with your brand”

photo4

Continuing Education (CEs)

Screen Shot 2017-06-02 at 10.55.08 AM

Faculty agrees to disclose any planned discussion of unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or devices during their presentation(s).

This live training activity qualifies for a maximum of five (5) continuing education hours. Attendees should claim only the hours commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Certificates of attendance will only be provided when the program evaluation has been filled out completely and returned to the registration desk at the end of the program day.

   Journey Mental Health Center has been approved by the National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC) as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 6760. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC hours are clearly identified. Journey Mental Health Center is solely responsible for all aspects of the program.

If you have any special accommodation or dietary needs, please contact Ron Luskin at ronluskin@tds.net Register today, space limited !

Keynote Speaker

Screen Shot 2017-06-02 at 10.54.37 AM

Honorable Everett Mitchell

Judge Mitchell is also Pastor of Christ the Solid Rock Baptist Church in Madison. He received a bachelor of arts degree from Morehouse College in mathematics and religion and earned a master of divinity and theology degrees from Princeton University. He received a law degree from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

“Do not follow the path that has been given, instead go to where there is no path and leave a trail.”

—Everett Mitchell

Conference Schedule

8:00 AM – Registration & Continental Breakfast

8:30 AM – Welcome: Ron Lampert, CEO, Journey Mental Health Center

8:45 AM – Keynote speaker Honorable Everett Mitchell

9:55 AM – Announcements

10:00 AM – Break

10:15 AM – Patient/consumer panel

11:00 AM – Break

11:15 AM – Morning Breakout Sessions (options A-F)

12:15 PM – Lunch break

12:45 PM – Knowledge Cafe Sessions (Options 1-6)

1:45 PM – Break

2:00 PM – Afternoon Breakout Sessions (Options A-F)

3:00 PM – Break

3:15 PM – Application of learning, feedback

4:15 PM – Adjournment

Continuing education credits may be earned for attendance.

How to Register for the Conference

SOLD OUT!

The fee includes all sessions and lunch. Sorry, no refunds. On-street parking is available. Carpooling is encouraged!

This training qualifies for five (5) continuing education hours.  One fee covers all conference activities.  To register for the conference you will be asked to select a:

• Morning Session
• Knowledge Cafe Session
• Afternoon Session

from the tabs below.  You will be asked to select one each, after you click “View Event Cart” and “Proceed to Registration”.

NOTE: Morning sessions repeat in the afternoon.

Option A: Gabriel Javier UW- Madison

Care Through a Lavender Lens: Growing LGBTQ+ Cultural Competency

The lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer communities encounter systemic, institutional, and interpersonal roadblocks to culturally competent care. Microaggressions, social stigma, and minority stress create specific and barriers for LGBTQ+ people seeking mental health services. This session offers a space to learn about emerging and current terms, concepts and strategies to grow cultural awareness and competency regarding LGBTQ+ populations. Attention will be paid to addressing minority stress factors and considerations (e.g. LGBTQ+ identity and AODV; interpersonal/ domestic violence; identity development.)

Option B: Officer Jared Prado JD. Natalie Deibel, Andy Naylor Madison PD

Implicit Bias: A Clinical Approach

Develop a deeper understanding of how implicit bias and automatic cognitive associations influence the work of mental health professionals, particularly regarding marginalized individuals.” Through presentation and interactive exercises, attendees will explore scientifically-supported methods to reduce the harmful impacts of implicit bias and ensure better diagnosis and treatment.

Option C: Armando Henandez, PhD - Madison Metropolitan School District

Simply Begin Again: Introduction to Multicultural Practice

This interactive session will provide a basic introduction to the complex arena of diversity, inclusivity, equity, and cultural competence. We will explore a starting point to the development of becoming a culturally responsive practitioner. Practical advice on navigating some of the common challenges in this work will be considered.

Option D: Veronica Lazo

AODA Unidos Against Domestic Violence Antonio Drew Vann End Domestic Abuse Wisconsin Treatment Considerations for Latinx and African-American communities

As the Latinx community in the U.S. continues to grow, there is a greater need for culturally-relevant and culturally sensitive services. Equally important are similar capabilities to serve the African-American community. This session will guide you through barriers for diagnosis and treatment, including stigma associated with mental illness and its influence on attitudes toward mental health services, language access, immigration, socioeconomic factors and structure of care. We will discuss acculturation, cultural values, and myths; plus, the healthcare disparities the Latinx and African-American communities experience. Consideration will also be given to the importance of fostering the therapeutic alliance.

Option E: Maurizio Pugliese, DO UW

Psychiatry - Overcoming Language Barriers, a Prerequisite to Cultural Competency

Explore ethical considerations, address systemic issues, review best practices and discuss case examples which highlight key points that are relevant to best serving patients with limited English proficiency. Plus, discussion of the role of interpreters in mental health settings to facilitate good communication and high-quality outcomes.

Option F: Paula Graves, LPC And LMHC Melvin Juette
Deferred Prosecution Program Dane County DA Office

Strengthening families and reducing physical punishment with sensitivity to history and culture

Flowing from a new and innovative child abuse initiative, this interactive session explores the challenges faced in working to reduce physical punishment (including the cultural and historical context, outcomes associated with it, and norms surrounding use) plus strategies to strengthen families by reducing the multi-generational transmission of violence. Discussion will encompass prevention and intervention efforts focused on community engagement and education related to physical punishment, while promoting non-violent parenting methods using a culturally sensitive approach.

Option 1: Rachael Dozer - APSW And SAC-IT Ho-Chunk National Behavior Health

Creating a Safe Space through Cultural Humility

Join in a discussion on navigating “Native Feng Shui” to create a welcoming and healing environment. Explore how to process assessments and discover diagnoses in a client-centered and stigma-reducing fashion. The material is client tested from a rural, Native American perspective in behavioral health outpatient clinics.

Option 2: Richard Nunez, MD - Agrace Hospice Care

Cultural Considerations for Latinx at the End of Life

The dying process is difficult, both for patients and for their loved ones; it can be even more difficult when there are language and cultural differences between medical staff, patient and family. Continual growth of the Latinx community makes considering and understanding Latinx culture a necessity. In this session, learn about caring for Latinx patients and their families at the end of life.

Option 3: Vera Naputi, MS – Sherman Middle School

Real Talk: Hip-Hop is Bold, Brave and Beautiful

Practices that promote social justice must have teeth. They must move beyond feel-good language and gimmicks to real talk, real issues, and real action. This session will explore Hip Hop pedagogy. You will leave armed with ideas for building artistic expression and personal narratives with young people.

Option 4: Imam Ibrahim Saeed – Islamic Center Of Madison

Caring for Muslims of Various Ethnic Groups

Muslims are not a monolithic group. Understanding the subtleties of medical and behavioral health communication differences between various Muslim groups is invaluable for health professionals and others dealing with day-to-day situations on behalf of individuals and families.

Option 5: Fredrick Coleman, MD - Journey Mental Health Center

Cross Cultural Assessments with Special Consideration of Southeast Asians from Cambodia and Laos

Understand aspects of Cambodian and Hmong culture that affect presentation when seeking mental health care. Consider the implications of interaction of an individual or family being both embedded in a culture and interacting with a majority culture. Learn how to consider language and conceptual barriers to understanding and increase awareness of clinical interactions that affect treatment decisions.

Option 6: Captain Connie Walker - Retired US Navy

After War: They’re Not Coming Home to the VA, They’re Coming Home!

About twenty veterans take their own lives in this country every day. Physical and psychiatric injuries of war veterans and their families, undiagnosed and untreated, affect entire communities with outcomes of unemployment, domestic violence, drug addiction, homelessness, and suicide. Cultural competency is key to diagnosis, treatment, and access-to-care challenges of veterans and families; and veterans who are ineligible or opt out of VA healthcare.

Option A: Gabriel Javier UW- Madison

Care Through a Lavender Lens: Growing LGBTQ+ Cultural Competency

The lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer communities encounter systemic, institutional, and interpersonal roadblocks to culturally competent care. Microaggressions, social stigma, and minority stress create specific and barriers for LGBTQ+ people seeking mental health services. This session offers a space to learn about emerging and current terms, concepts and strategies to grow cultural awareness and competency regarding LGBTQ+ populations. Attention will be paid to addressing minority stress factors and considerations (e.g. LGBTQ+ identity and AODV; interpersonal/ domestic violence; identity development.)

Option B: Officer Jared Prado JD. Natalie Deibel, Andy Naylor Madison PD

Implicit Bias: A Clinical Approach

Develop a deeper understanding of how implicit bias and automatic cognitive associations influence the work of mental health professionals, particularly regarding marginalized individuals. Through presentation and interactive exercises, attendees will explore scientifically-supported methods to reduce the harmful impacts of implicit bias and ensure better diagnosis and treatment.

Option C: Armando Henandez, PhD - Madison Metropolitan School District

Simply Begin Again: Introduction to Multicultural Practice

This interactive session will provide a basic introduction to the complex arena of diversity, inclusivity, equity, and cultural competence. We will explore a starting point to the development of becoming a culturally responsive practitioner. Practical advice on navigating some of the common challenges in this work will be considered.

Option D: Veronica Lazo

AODA Unidos Against Domestic Violence Antonio Drew Vann End Domestic Abuse Wisconsin Treatment Considerations for Latinx and African-American communities

As the Latinx community in the U.S. continues to grow, there is a greater need for culturally-relevant and culturally sensitive services. Equally important are similar capabilities to serve the African-American community. This session will guide you through barriers for diagnosis and treatment, including stigma associated with mental illness and its influence on attitudes toward mental health services, language access, immigration, socioeconomic factors and structure of care. We will discuss acculturation, cultural values, and myths; plus, the healthcare disparities the Latinx and African-American communities experience. Consideration will also be given to the importance of fostering the therapeutic alliance.

Option E: Maurizio Pugliese, DO UW

Psychiatry - Overcoming Language Barriers, a Prerequisite to Cultural Competency

Explore ethical considerations, address systemic issues, review best practices and discuss case examples which highlight key points that are relevant to best serving patients with limited English proficiency. Plus, discussion of the role of interpreters in mental health settings to facilitate good communication and high-quality outcomes.

Option F: Paula Graves, LPC And LMHC Melvin Juette
Deferred Prosecution Program Dane County DA Office

Strengthening families and reducing physical punishment with sensitivity to history and culture

Flowing from a new and innovative child abuse initiative, this interactive session explores the challenges faced in working to reduce physical punishment (including the cultural and historical context, outcomes associated with it, and norms surrounding use) plus strategies to strengthen families by reducing the multi-generational transmission of violence. Discussion will encompass prevention and intervention efforts focused on community engagement and education related to physical punishment, while promoting non-violent parenting methods using a culturally sensitive approach.